Sweden’s got a crazy new photo-sharing law that it can’t possibly enforce|TNW

Swedes create a situation in which everybody’s life gets more difficult, while the law is unenforceable: Wikimedia’s Swedish arm has just lost a case in the country’s Supreme Court, which has ruled that people must get permission from artists before they post images of public art – including statues and buildings – online.

That’s a ruling that opens up a whole new legal minefield for holiday Instagrammers, Tweeters and Facebookers everywhere – as well as potentially the owners of those sites too, if they’re seen as liable for what users post.

This is nearly as bad as the attempt to compel photographers to ask for permission before taking pictures of buildings and monuments, at the European level (http://jeanmariecavada.eu/ma-position-sur-le-droit-de-panorama/#comment-15787 – in French). The moronic law is undergoing consultation, but it’s not dead, yet. If you value freedom of the press, but also freedom to take pictures in the street, you should let these people know what you think about it.

Wikimedia’s Swedish arm has lost a case in the country’s Supreme Court, meaning people must get permission before they post images of public art online.

Source: Sweden’s got a crazy new photo-sharing law that it can’t possibly enforce

UA-2750533-1
%d bloggers like this: